The CANT Z.1007 Alcione

Italy
Italy

Sorry, No ID pictures yet

This medium bomber was designed by a shipbuilding company who wanted to extend their activities to aircraft. The designer of the Alcione (= Kingfisher), Filippo Zappata, was persuaded by the Italian government to work for Italy, instead of France (Blé riot). It was an all wood, monowing aircraft with three powerplants and a crew of 5. The prototype flew in march 1937, and the government ordered 34 solely for evaluation.

The results of the tests with this first pre-version imposed a couple of changes on the first real operational version, the CANT Z.1007bis. The bis version was a little bigger, and had powerplants with more output. It was built in 9 series, the first three with a single vertical tail unit, the other six with a double vertical tail unit for an improved field of fire of the rearward firing guns.

Versions:

Further pictures:

CANT Z.1007bis in full flight
CANT Z.1007bis in full flight

 

Technical data on the CANT Z.1007bis Alcione
Powerplant 3 × Piaggio P.XI R2C.40 radials, rated at 1000 hp (745.49 kW) each Role during war
  • Medium Bomber
  • Torpedo Bomber
Length 60 ft 2.5 inch Height 17 ft 1.5 inch
Empty weight 19338 lb Operational weight 30029 lb max
Wing Span 81 ft 4.33 inch Wing Aspect ratio 8.2
Wing Area 807.29 sq ft Service ceiling 26900 ft
Maximum speed 290 mph at 13125 ft Cruising speed 235 mph at 18375 ft
Initial climb rate Climb to 13,125 ft in 10 min 30 sec Range 1087 miles typical
Fuel capacity internal unknown Fuel capacity external -
Machine guns
  • 1 × 0.50 inch trainable in dorsal turret, 350 rounds
  • 1 × 0.50 inch trainable rearward-firing in ventral step, 350 rounds
  • 2 × 0.303 inch trainable lateral-firing in beam positions, 500 rounds each
Cannons -
Bomb load Maximum 2,646 lb,in lower fuselage bay and/or on 2 wingmounted hardpoints in various setups:
  • 2 × 1,102 lb or 4 × 551 lb, or 18 × 220 lb, or 18 × 110 lb, or 20 × 44 lb, or 32 × 33 lb in fuselage bay.
  • 2 × 1,102 lb, or 4 × 551 lb under wingmounted hardpoints.
Torpedoes/rockets 2 × 1,102 lb torpedoes in stead of bombs.
Crew 5: pilot, co-pilot, navigator/bombardier/radio operator, 2 gunners. Naval or ground based Ground
First flight (prototype) March, 1937 Operational Service 1939-1948
Manufacturer Cantiere Navale Triestino (CANT), later reorganized to Cantieri Riuniti dell'Adriatico (CRDA) Number produced 563 total, 526 bis/ter versions
Metric system
Length 18.35 m Height 5.22 m
Empty weight 8772 kg Operational weight 13621 kg max
Wing Span 24.8 m Wing Aspect ratio 8.2
Wing Area 75 m² Service ceiling 8199 m
Maximum speed 467 km/h at 4000 m Cruising speed 378 km/h at 5601 m
Initial climb rate Climb to 4000 m in 10 min 30 sec Range 1749 km typical
Fuel capacity internal unknown Fuel capacity external -
Machine guns
  • 1 × 12 mm trainable in dorsal turret, 350 rounds
  • 1 × 12 mm trainable rearward-firing in ventral step, 350 rounds
  • 2 × 7.7 mm trainable lateral-firing in beam positions, 500 rounds each
Cannons -
Bomb load Maximum 1.200 kg, in lower fuselage bay and/or on 2 wingmounted hardpoints in various setups:
  • 2 × 500 kg or 4 × 250 kg, or 18 × 100 kg, or 18 × 50 kg, or 20 × 20 kg, or 32 × 15 kg in fuselage bay.
  • 2 × 500 kg, or 4 × 250 kg under wingmounted hardpoints.
Torpedoes/rockets 2 × 500 kg torpedoes in stead of bombs.

Here is a quick overview of all different versions, without the full technical specifications:

Different versions of the CANT Z.1007  Alcione
CANT Z.1007bis Initial production model, see description above. Number built: 527 (total).
Number built: unknown out of a total of 536
CANT Z.1007ter Improved verion upon the bis version. The powerplants were Piaggio P.XIX RC 45 radials, each rated at 1,175 hp (875 kW).
Number built: unknown out of a total of 536

Remarks:

This bomber saw action from the English coastal areas to the Souther Russian theatre, but mostly in the Mediterranean theatre of Operations and Greece. Together with the Savoia Marchetti SM.79 Sparviero it formed the backbone of the Italian Bomber fleet.

Strengths:

Weaknesses:

 

 

© by Frans Bonné, 2000
Last revision: 9/20/00