The De Havilland Mosquito 

(Reconnaissance and Trainer variants)

Great Britain
Great Britain

side viewfront viewunder view

Much is said already in the previous page. Since the mosquito bomber was already envisioned as an unarmed aircraft (save for the disposable warloads of course) it was logical to look into a Photographic Reconnaissance type. All PR-type Mosquito's carried standard a camera for reconnaissance duties (of course).

Versions:

Further pictures:

A De Havilland Mosquito in full flight
A De Havilland Mosquito in full flight

 

Technical data on the De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk IX Photo Reconnaissance
Powerplant 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 72/73 Vee, in 'M' gear rated at 1,680 hp (1.253 kW) and in 'S' gear rated 1,460 hp (1.089 kW), or 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 76/77 Vee, in 'S' gear rated at 1,475 hp (1.100 kW), and in 'M' gear, rated at 1710 hp (1274.79 kW) each Role during war
  • Fighter-bomber
  • Night-Fighter
  • Medium Bomber
  • Reconnaissance Aircraft
  • Trainer
Length 44 ft 6 inch Height 17 ft 5 inch tail up, 12 ft 6 inch tail down
Empty weight 14569 lb Operational weight 22000 lb max
Wing Span 54 ft 2 inch Wing Aspect ratio 6.46
Wing Area 454 sq ft Service ceiling 34500 ft
Maximum speed 408 mph at optimum altitude Cruising speed 250 mph at optimum altitude
Initial climb rate 2,850 ft per min Range 2450 miles max
Fuel capacity internal 539 Imp gal (647 US gal), plus provision for up to 221 Imp gal (265 US gal) of auxiliary fuel in fuselage fuel tanks Fuel capacity external Up to 400 Imp gal (480 US gal) in 2 × 200, 100, or 50 Imp gal (240, 120, or 60 US gal) drop tanks
Machine guns -Cannons -
Bomb load -Torpedoes/rockets -
Crew 2: pilot, navigator Naval or ground based Ground
First flight (prototype) 25 October 1940 Operational Service November 1941 - 1961
Manufacturer De Havilland Aircraft co. Ltd. Number produced 7,757 total, 90 this version
Metric system
Length 13.56 m Height 5.31 m tail up, 3.81 m tail down
Empty weight 6608 kg Operational weight 9979 kg max
Wing Span 16.51 m Wing Aspect ratio 6.46
Wing Area 42.18 m² Service ceiling 10516 m
Maximum speed 657 km/h at optimum altitude Cruising speed 402 km/h at optimum altitude
Initial climb rate 869 m per min Range 3943 km max
Fuel capacity internal 2450 liters, plus provision for up to 1004 liters of auxiliary fuel in fuselage fuel tanks Fuel capacity external Up to 1818 liters in 2 × 909, 454 or 227 liters drop tanks
Machine guns -Cannons -
Bomb load -Torpedoes/rockets -

Technical data on the De Havilland Mosquito T.Mk III Trainer
Powerplant 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 21 or 23 (higher take-off output) Vee, rated at 1,480 hp (1.103 kW) , or 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 25 Vee, rated at 1620 hp (1207.69 kW) each Role during war
  • Fighter-bomber
  • Night-Fighter
  • Medium Bomber
  • Reconnaissance Aircraft
Length 41 ft 2 inch with tail up, 40 ft 10 in with tail down Height 17 ft 5 inch with tail up, 15 ft 3 in with tail down
Empty weight 14300 lb Operational weight 20000 lb max
Wing Span 54 ft 2 inch Wing Aspect ratio 6.46
Wing Area 454 sq ft Service ceiling 37500 ft
Maximum speed 384 mph at optimum altitude Cruising speed 260 mph at optimum altitude
Initial climb rate 2,500 ft per min Range 1560 miles typical
Fuel capacity internal 453 Imp gal (544 US gal), plus provision for up to 163 Imp gal (195 US gal) of auxiliary fuel in fuselage fuel tanks Fuel capacity external Up to 200 Imp gal (240 US gal) in 2 × 100, or 50 Imp gal (120, or 60 US gal) drop tanks
Machine guns -Cannons -
Bomb load -Torpedoes/rockets -
Crew 2: pilot, instructor Naval or ground based Ground
First flight (prototype) 25 October 1940 Operational Service November 1941 - 1961
Manufacturer De Havilland Aircraft co. Ltd. Number produced 7,757 total, 2708 this version
Metric system
Length 12.55 m with tail up, 12.45 with tail down Height 5.31 m with tail up, 4.65 with tail down
Empty weight 6486 kg Operational weight 9072 kg max
Wing Span 16.51 m Wing Aspect ratio 6.46
Wing Area 42.18 m² Service ceiling 11430 m
Maximum speed 618 km/h at optimum altitude Cruising speed 418 km/h at optimum altitude
Initial climb rate 762 m per min Range 2511 km typical
Fuel capacity internal 2059 liters, plus provision for up to 741 liters of auxiliary fuel in fuselage fuel tanks Fuel capacity external Up to 909 liters in 2 × 454 or 227 liters drop tanks
Machine guns -Cannons -
Bomb load -Torpedoes/rockets -

Here is a quick overview of all different versions, without the full technical specifications:

Different versions of the De Havilland Mosquito 
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk I The last of the prtotypes, the first to be in operational service (August 1941). All aircraft were fitted with 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 21's, rated at 1,480 hp (1.303 kW) each. They had the original short engine nacelle that induced turbulence on the tail and caused instabilities. 2 were tropicalized for the Mediterranean and Far East theatres.
All aircraft operated under the No. 1 PRU, and performed tasks such as pre-bombing raid reconnaissnce, after-bombing damage assessment, location of German warships, discoveries of German tactical targets such as radar sites, etc. The unit aquited itself very well of its tasks, and made important discoveries.
Number built: 9
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk IV The number of discoveries by the No. 1 PRU nessecitated the use of more PR-type aircraft. More squadrons were formed, which received converted B.Mk IV Series 2 aircraft, 32 in total. By removing all bombing equipment and other non vital equipment the speed, range and ceiling were improved. They were fitted with the same Merlin 21's, or with 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin Vee 23's rated at 1,480 hp (1.303 kW) each (but which had a better low-level performance). The normal take-off weight was 18,000 lb (8.165 kg), max take-off weight was 19,050 lb (8.641 kg), depending on the use of drop tanks.
Number converted: 32
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk VIII To ensure the success of the 2 former version it was necessary to increase the speed and ceiling to avoid interception by better enemy aircraft. Being only an interim type, the PR.Mk VIII were converted from B.Mk IV Series 2 Mosquito bombers, but fitted with 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 61 with 2-stage supercharger, rated at 1,680 hp (1.253 kW) each. The max speed increased to 436 Mph (702 km/h), empty and max take-off weights were 14,252 lb (6.465 kg) and 21,395 lb (9.705 kg) respectively. The service ceiling increased to 38,000 ft (11.580 m).
Number converted: 5
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk XVI Like the B.Mk IX Bomber stood model for the PR.Mk IX , the B.Mk XVI was the base on which the PR.Mk XVI was built. It had a pressurized cockpit for extreme altitudes, and included 'Rebecca', 'Boozer', and H2X radar mapping equipment It had the same engines as the PR.Mk IX, and had a maximum level speed of 415 Mph (668 km/h). It's empty, typical and max take-off weights were 14,635 lb (6.638 kg), 21,916 lb (9.941 kg) and 23,630 lb (10.719 kg) respectively. The maximum range was 2,450 miles (3.943 km).
Number built: 432
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk 32 To provide even better performance, 5 PR.Mk XVI were converted. They had 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 113/114, rated at 1,690 hp (1.260 kW) each. The wings were extended to 59 ft 2 inch (18,03 m).
Number built: 31
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk 34 The final Recce version that saw action in World War 2. It was equipped with one F.24 Oblique camera, and four F.52 vertical cameras. It was designed to operate in the utmost range and ceiling. This version had all crew and fueltank armor removed, increasing the fuel capacity to 1,269 Imp gal (1,523 US gal, 5.768 liters). The maximum level speed was 425 Mph (684 km/h) at an altitude of 30,000 ft (9145 m), a ceiling of 43,000 ft (13.105 m) and had a range of 3,500 miles (5.633 km).
Number built: 50
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk 34A After the War some Mosquito PR.Mk 34's were converted to PR.Mk 34A's, which included 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 113A/114A, modified 'Gee' navigation system and improved landing gear retraction system.
Number converted: unknown
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk 35 The final version post-war development, a number of B.Mk 35 Bombers were converted. This version had photo-flash equipment for night-time photography.
Number converted: unknown
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk 40 Australian PR Mosquito's, converted form the FB.Mk 40 Fighter-bombers, and fitted with 2 Merlin 31's or 33's.
Number converted: 6
De Havilland Mosquito PR.Mk 41 Australian built PR Mosquito's, unknown which model they were based on or further statistical information (yet). Fitted with two Merlin 69 engines.
Number built: 28
De Havilland F-8 Conversions of 5 and 35 aircraft from the B.Mk VII and B.Mk XX bombers respectively. Used by the USAAF, from which this designation comes from.
Number converted: 40
De Havilland Mosquito T.Mk III, or T.Mk 3 As well as conversions from F.Mk II Night fighters, as newly built machines (after the war), these aircraft were advanced trainers. The T.Mk 3 designation was assigned after the War
Number built: at least 356
De Havilland Mosquito T.Mk 22 Canadian built equivalent, based on the FB.Mk 21, and fitted with 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 33, rated at 1,460 hp (1.088 kW) each.
Number built: 4
De Havilland Mosquito T.Mk 27 Improved version of the T.mk 22, and fitted with 2 × Rolls Royce Merlin 225, rated at 1,620 hp (1.208 kW) each.
Number built: 50
De Havilland Mosquito T.Mk 29 Conversion of the FB.Mk 26, and fitted with 2 Merlin 225's.
Number converted: 29
De Havilland Mosquito T.Mk 43 Australian built T.Mk III., based on the FN.Mk 40, fitted with 2 Merlin 33 engines.
Number built: 22

Remarks:

Although not immediately flying in the spotlight, the Recce and Trainer aircraft played their (sometimes vital) role during the War. A lot of good work was done, and especially the Recce aircraft had incredible performances.

Strengths:

Weaknesses:

 

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© by Frans Bonné, 2000
Last revision: 2/9/01