The Fokker G.I Jachtkruiser

The Netherlands
The Netherlands

Sorry, No ID pictures yet

The Jachtkruiser (fightercruiser/huntcruiser) was the pride of the Dutch airforce in 1940, too bad there were only so few, and not fully armed like they should have been. I believe that the design was the first twin-boom model, but since I'm Dutch I'm probably biased :-). Correct me if I'm wrong :-). Baceuse of this, the G.I generated considerable interest during an airshow in Paris in 1937, resulting eventually a number of foreign orders by Spain, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Hungary and Sweden.
Problems with the engines and with embargoes everywhere meant that none of the foreign 136 confirmed ordered aircraft and licenses in Spain and Hungary were delivered or even produced (finnished), making the Grand Total only a meager 42 before the war. Some 20 aircraft were finnished after Germany had invaded the Netherlands and Denmark, and operated them as advanced trainers until 1942.

Versions:

Further pictures:

The Fokker G.I Jachtkruiser in full flight
The Fokker G.I Jachtkruiser in full flight

The Fokker G.I Jachtkruiser in full flight
The Fokker G.I Jachtkruiser in full flight

 

Technical data on the Fokker G.I-1 Jachtkruiser
Powerplant 2 × Bristol Mercury VIII radial, rated at 830 hp (618.76 kW) each Role during war
  • Fighter
  • Close Support Attack Fighter
  • Advanced Trainer
Length 35 ft 7.9 inch Height 12 ft 5.6 inch
Empty weight 7341 lb Operational weight 11023 lb max
Wing Span 56 ft 3.6 inch Wing Aspect ratio 7.96
Wing Area 412.67 sq ft Service ceiling 30510 ft
Maximum speed 295 mph at 13450 ft Cruising speed 238 mph at 13995 ft
Initial climb rate 2,736 ft per min,
Climb to 19,685 ft in 8 min 54 sec
Range 932 miles max
Fuel capacity internal unknown Fuel capacity external -
Machine guns
  • 8 × 0.312 inch FN-Browning M.36 fixed forward firing in the nose
  • 1 × 0.312 inch FN-Browning M.36 trainable rearward-firinggun in the nacelle tailcone position
Cannons -
Bomb load Up to 882 lb carried on four underwing hardpoints rated at 220 lb, and generally comprising of 4 × 220 lb bombs Torpedoes/rockets -
Crew 2: One of the following options: pilot, radio operator/gunner. Optionally 3: Pilot, radio operator and gunner (first four aircraft) Naval or ground based Ground
First flight (prototype) 16 March 1937 Operational Service July 1939 - 1942
Manufacturer N.V. Nederlandsche Vliegtuigenfabriek Fokker Number produced 59 total, 36 plus some out of 20 German planes this version
Metric system
Length 10.87 m Height 3.8 m
Empty weight 3330 kg Operational weight 5000 kg max
Wing Span 17.16 m Wing Aspect ratio 7.96
Wing Area 38.34 m² Service ceiling 9299 m
Maximum speed 475 km/h at 4100 m Cruising speed 383 km/h at 4266 m
Initial climb rate 834 m per min,
Climb to 6.000 m in 8 min 54 sec
Range 1500 km max
Fuel capacity internal unknown Fuel capacity external -
Machine guns
  • 8 × 7,92 mm FN-Browning M.36 fixed forward firing in the nose
  • 1 × 7,92 mm FN-Browning M.36 trainable rearward-firinggun in the nacelle tailcone position
Cannons -
Bomb load Up to 400 kg carried on four underwing hardpoints rated at 100 kg, and generally comprising of 4 × 100 kg bombs Torpedoes/rockets -

Here is a quick overview of all different versions, without the full technical specifications:

Different versions of the Fokker G.I  Jachtkruiser
Fokker G.I-1 Because the Netherlands already had fighters fitted with the Mercury they wanted the G.I fitted with them as well to ease maintenance and logistics. The prototype had flown with 2 × Hispano-Suiza counter rotating radials, rated at 680 hp (507 kW) each, and with 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1535-SB4-G Twin Wasp Junior radials, rated at 750 hp (559 kW) each.
The first four were 3-seaters, the rest 2-seaters. See specifics above.
Number built: 36, plus some out of 20 German aircraft
Fokker G.I-1 (Wasp) Originating from a Spanish order, these aircraft were powered by 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1535-SB4-G Twin Wasp Junior radials, rated at 750 hp (559 kW) each. Other details are: A span of 54 ft 1.6 in (16,50 m), an aspect ratio of 7,63 and an area of 384.28 sq ft (35,70 mē), length of 34 ft 0.8 in (10,38 m), height of 10 ft 11.9 in (3,35 m), empty weight of 6,944 lb (3.150 kg), normal take-off 9,700 lb (4.400 kg), max take-off weight of 10,582 lb (4.800 kg), maximum level speed of 276.5 mph (445 km/h) at 10,990 ft (3.350 m), cruising speed of 227 mph (365 km/h) at optimum altitude, range of 870 miles (1.400 km), and service ceiling of 29,855 ft (9.100 m).
Number built: 3, plus some out of 20 German aircraft
Fokker G.I-1a Redesignation of the Fokker G.I-1 (Mercury).
Fokker G.I-1b Redesignation of the Fokker G.I-1 (Wasp).

Remarks:

The only G.I's operational at the outbreak of the War were the Dutch aircraft, 23 (Mercury) of them. In the first pre-emptive strike of the German forces a number of these were destroyed on the ground at Bergen-op-Zoom and Waalhaven. The remaining fighters fought with distinction and achived some successes, but the battle was lost already because of the sheer numbers of the opposition. None of these survived the 5 days of war in the Netherlands.
The Spanish ordered aircraft were all ready, save for the armament. When the Netherlands were attacked 3 of them were hastily fitted with 3 × 0.312 in (7,92 mm) guns and pressed into service, but only saw limited action. After Germany defeated the Netherlands these aircraft were pressed into German service
I believe 1 aircraft managed to escape to Great Britain, but I'm not sure about this. I'll look it up for you.

Strengths:

Weaknesses:

 

 

© by Frans Bonné, 2000
Last revision: 9/20/00